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WHO demands: Limit antibiotics in agriculture


The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 80% of antibiotics are used for animal fattening - for healthy animals, not for sick ones. The WHO calls for this to be drastically reduced.

Stop routine delivery
The new guidelines of the WHO recommend: States should only use antibiotics for animals that have little medical significance for humans, and the food industry should stop antibiotics from being taken for granted.

Antibiotic resistance
Constant antibiotics created resistance, which would make it difficult to treat sick people. What is more, a lack of effective antibiotics is like the onset of a deadly disease.

The fewer antibiotics, the more effective
On the other hand, not using antibiotics reduces the resistance of the pathogens. Instead of medication, pet owners should focus on better hygiene.

In comparison, few antibiotics in Germany
In Germany, little antibiotics are used in stables compared to other countries, and the quantities given to veterinarians have halved since 2011. Animals would be screened for diseases before taking antibiotics.

Antibiotic use continues to decline
In Germany, the use of antibiotics is steadily declining. In the case of medications that are also important for people, use decreased by 20% within a year. In addition, it has long been prohibited in Germany to use antibiotics to promote performance.

Resistance increases
There is a reason for the WHO demand: Today, antibiotics help less and less globally. Around 25,000 people die in Europe every year because antibiotics no longer protect against the specific diseases. Scientists have found that increasing resistance to antibiotics poses the greatest threat to human health.

Targeted use of antibiotics
For some biologists and doctors, the WHO recommendations do not go far enough. They demand globally that the same applies in agriculture as in human medicine. Antibiotics should only be used if there is a need to contain diseases.

Lesson Colistin
The antibiotic colistin was first used in animal breeding and was used to promote the growth of chickens and pigs. When human medicine used it on humans, resistant pathogens had already formed.

Cheap production aid
The scientist Lance Price says: "Multi-resistant super-pathogens are increasing because we do not stop wasting valuable medicine through excessive use in human medicine and as cheap production aid in agricultural animal husbandry." (Dr. Utz Anhalt)

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Video: What can we learn from the use of antibiotics in agriculture? (June 2021).