Category Medicinal plants

Wild fruit - healing power on the doorstep
Medicinal plants

Wild fruit - healing power on the doorstep

Wild fruits are shrubs and shrubs, the fruits of which we can eat. This also includes the archetypes of our apples, pears or cherries. Collecting and planting wild fruit is in vogue - with good reason: The wild fruits contain plenty of vitamins, minerals and vital substances; they usually taste more intense than cultivars and some have a high value as ornamental plants.

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Medicinal plants

Queen of meadows - meadowsweet: active ingredients, application and own cultivation

The meadow queen bears many names: wild lilac, solstice, meadow goatee or r├╝sterstaude. The common name "meadow aspirin" refers to its effect as a pain reliever and is not just a metaphor: meadowsweet contains acetylsalicylic acid, the basic ingredient of aspirin. It is called meadowsweet from old Germanic times: our ancestors used it to sweeten mead, an alcoholic drink that they loved as much as beer - a smart idea, because it prevented the hangover during breeding.
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Medicinal plants

Chaste tree - effect, application and side effects

Chaste tree belongs to the verbena family and originally comes from the Mediterranean and the Near East. Its Latin name agnus castus means "chaste lamb". The shrub can reach five meters in height. The individual stems are square; the leaves have the shape of lancets, are black-green at the top and covered with white down on the underside.
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Medicinal plants

Wild mallow medicinal plant

Malva sylvestris was known as a medicinal plant in ancient times. The wild mallow has many names. It is called hemp poplar, piss flower, black mallow or even poplar. The name Poplar has nothing to do with the tree, but is derived from the old word Papp, which means porridge, because mallow served as food for children.
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Medicinal plants

Fungi in culture: use, effect and meaning for humans

Mushrooms and Humans: Mythology and Mycology Mushrooms are not animals and not plants, but rather strange creatures. Many mushrooms contain poisons that can kill people, others change the senses. In many cultures, they were therefore seen as carriers of mysterious powers; they were ingredients for magic, and shamans used them to enter the "other reality".
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